The use of the color white in the poem design by robert frost

In the final version Frost moves the second half of the original fifth line, "assorted death and blight," to line 4 and extends it to "assorted characters of death and blight," thereby introducing the important metaphor of kitchen domesticity that he will pursue through line 7.

The moth is a prize being held high by the spider, like a piece of rigid satin cloth. The poet is being ironic, choosing white to contrast deeply with the dark business of the hunting and devouring spider, in cahoots with the ironically named heal-all.

This technique is used a lot in the book of Psalms from the bible. Or rather we cannot by any possibility comprehend it. The persona who compares a dead moth with a "white piece of rigid satin cloth" can hardly be as lighthearted as his casual, unemotional tone might suggest--not given the deathly connotations of rigidity and the funereal associations of satin cloth.

Do I use the word aright?

Frost On Death

In the final six lines, the sestet, the speaker attempts to resolve this ambivalence. The Work of Knowing.

Analysis of Birches by Robert Frost

Few poems by Frost are more perfectly and surely composed, few where the figure in the mind and in the ear are better matched. Compare the Four Ordering Options 1. Further Analysis Design does ask some profound questions about the nature of the universe, whether or not it is godless - or if there is an omnipotent intelligence why design darkness into the fabric of life?

In replacing the entire line, Frost chooses to deepen the question he asks about the tableau he has witnessed. And this little albino catastrophe is too whitely catastrophic to be accidental, too impossibly unlikely ever to be a coincidence: Is it at all possible to say that all of these simple white things came together by pure coincidence?

It may after all be absurd to see so much in a flower, a moth, and a spider. InFrost sailed with his family to Great Britainsettling first in Beaconsfielda small town outside London. But if cosmic confidence is right not wrong, better not worse, that is a most important meaning.

Note the word kindred which means that the flower and the spider shared the same spirit; they were in relation to one another when the unfortunate moth came along. May no fate willfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return.

In the octave, the speaker describes an ambivalent observation of a spider killing its prey, a moth. It was as if one should say "My shoes are evidently designed to fit my feet, hence it is impossible that they should have been produced by machinery. The spider, fattened by a previous victim, holds a dead white moth like a rigid piece of satin cloth or a rigid waxy corpse in a coffin.

Consider, for example, the daring use of the same end-rhymes, half the total number on a single sound. They eventually forecast his downfall, undermining the concept of freewill, implying that there is some grand design behind all life.

In doubt he asks God if he called out his name He tries to think of something else as the 'word of God. Analysis of Design Design is a Petrarchan sonnet with a changed sestet.

And assorted characters of death and blight is, like so many things in this poem, sharply ambiguous: The single change in line 7 turns "beady spider" into "snow-drop spider," reinstating the adjective which Frost had discarded from his original first line.

In mythology moth's are connected with fire, to have an intensity while lasting, also moths are drawn to flame regardless of the source even though it may cause them death. Taking back with one hand what he gives with the other, Frost offers a "dimpled spider," "a flower like a froth," and "dead wings carried like a paper kite.

The old question of whether there is design is idle. Robert Frost Source Robert Frost and Design Design is a fourteen line sonnet which explores the notion that nature and the whole universe is designed by a malevolent intelligence. The simile returns us to the implicitly "childlike" description of the spider in the opening line.

A Personal Nature – The poet Robert Frost

Nevertheless, even a perfunctory review of "Design" underlines its radical difference from the narrative poems: The poem did not spring into being fully formed after a single bout with the Muse. What had that flower to do with being white, The wayside blue and innocent heal-all?Read, review and discuss the Design poem by Robert Frost on kitaharayukio-arioso.com Login.

I found a dimpled spider, fat and white, On a white heal-all, holding up a moth Like a white piece of rigid satin cloth--Assorted characters of death and blight Mixed ready to begin the morning right.

About “Design” Though very short and conveying a simple image of a spider landing on a flower, we soon realize that Frost is also questioning life and its cruelties.

For a dark poem, Frost sure picked a weird color to focus on. Actually, that's kind of the point. He contrasts the light innocence of white with the potentially evil design behind their color.

For a dark poem, Frost sure picked a weird color to focus on. Actually, that's kind of the point. He contrasts the light innocence of white with the potentially evil design behind their color scheme. The poem begins with a simple setup—the first three lines introduce us to the main characters.

We have a big white spider on a white flower, poised to eat a white moth. Design by Robert Frost I found a dimpled spider, fat and white, On a white heal-all, holding up a moth Like a white piece of rigid satin cloth--Assorted characters of death and blight Mixed ready to begin the morning right, Like the ingredients of a witches' broth--A snow-drop spider, a flower like a froth, And dead wings carried like a paper kite.

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The use of the color white in the poem design by robert frost
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